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 :: Wednesday, July 25
 :: Friday, July 27

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AMI HQ
201 E. Main Street
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Lexington, KY 40507
USA

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University of Toronto Mississauga

The AMI will provide private bus transportation for all attendees from the Delta Chelsea Hotel to the workshop locations and back.


Biovisualization with Maya and Molecular Maya
Instructors: Gaël McGill
Location: University of Toronto Mississauga, CCT3160
Time: 8:30am - 5:30pm (includes one hour break for lunch from 12:30pm-1:30pm)
Cost: Member $150 / Non-Member $295
0.4 CEUs art, 0.4 CEUs biomedical
Maximum size 15 -
Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list
Description: This workshop will introduce participants to the power and flexibility of Autodesk's 3D software package Maya-a workhorse in the film industry's special effects and animated feature films. This day-long workshop will cover all the major phases of the 3D production pipeline: modeling, surfacing, animation, dynamics, and rendering with a focus on how Maya's broad set of tools can be adapted for biovisualization. We will also cover how the Molecular Maya toolkit allows for importing and animation of Protein Data Bank (PDB) datasets within Maya. By the end of this workshop, participants will have a better understanding of Maya's tools (and how they may apply to their work and research in the life sciences) and will have rigged and created a simple molecular binding animation.


Gaël McGill is the Digital Director for E.O. Wilson's Life on Earth digital biology textbook. He is also Director of Molecular Visualization at the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School, and Founder & CEO of Digizyme, Inc. a firm dedicated to the visualization and communication of science. McGill is the creator of the online portal molecularmovies.org and the Molecular Maya software toolkit. He is also a technical editor for Wiley/SYBEX Publishing where he has contributed to leading Maya and ZBrush textbooks. McGill is also a board member of the Vesalius Trust. After his receiving his BA summa cum laude in biology, music, and art history from Swarthmore College, and PhD at Harvard Medical School as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Sandoz Pharmaceuticals fellow, McGill completed his postdoctoral work at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute studying tumor cell apoptosis and melanoma.

Harvesting Medical Imaging Datasets: An Open Source and Multi-Platform Workflow
Instructors: Patrick Kania
Location: University of Toronto Mississauga, HSC315
8:30am to 12:30pm
Cost: Member $115 / Non-Member $225
0.2 CEUs art, 0.2 CEUs biomedical
Maximum size 16

Description: This workshop is a continuation of the Harvesting Medical Images workshop from the 2011 Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. We will focus on a workflow that segments a 3D model from a medical imaging dataset, then explore methods of optimizing and re-topologizing the extracted model for various production purposes (eg, animation, interactive 3D, etc.) Participants will be able to analyze and extract 3D models from a medical imaging dataset, utilize re-topology techniques in order to build an original and more efficient mesh, and take the model into a sculpting program to add additional detail. Patrick Kania is a self-employed 3D modeler. He works mainly for ImmersiveTouch, Inc. fulfilling the modeling, texturing, and data retrieval needs using CTs and MRIs. These tasks assist the company in developing surgical simulations in virtual reality with the added benefit of haptic feedback.





Anatomical Illustration Workshop:
Draw What Can Be Seen!


Instructors: Ahmet Sinav, MD, CMI, Steven J. Harrison, PhD, CMI and Anne Agur, PhD


Session 1: Skull Base Anatomy and Dissection
Location: University of Toronto Mississauga
HSC414 Anatomy Lab
8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Member $115 / Non-Member $225
0.2 CEUs art, 0.2 CEUs biomedical
Maximum size 10 -

Session 1: Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list

Session 2: Cardiac Anatomy and Dissection
Location: University of Toronto Mississauga
HSC414 Anatomy Lab
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Member $115 / Non-Member $225
0.2 CEUs art, 0.2 CEUs biomedical
Maximum size 10 -
Session 2: Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list
Description: These workshops are composed of two dissection demonstrations, along with sketching and a critique. The areas of dissection will be the skull base (in the morning) and the heart (in the afternoon). You may register for one workshop, or both. Dr. Sinav will demonstrate the anatomical dissection of these areas, then two hours will be given for participants to draw their anatomical sketches. Finally, an hour of critique will be performed by Dr. Sinav, Dr. Harrison, and Dr. Agur (U of Toronto Faculty of Medicine) together with the participants.


The workshop is limited for 10 participants for each session.


Note: Participants should bring sketch pads & drawing tools of their choice; photography will not be allowed.


Ahmet Sinav, M.D., C.M.I. is a Professor of Human Anatomy and a Board Certified Medical Illustrator. He was born in Turkey in 1961. He received his M.D. degree from Gulhane Military Medical School (GMMS) in 1986, and trained as a Human Anatomist. He has been teaching anatomy in Turkey and at the USA at Columbia University and the Medical College of Georgia. Currently, he is the dean of the School of Fine Arts at Trakya University and teaches gross anatomy in Edirne, Turkey. His research interests include developing interactive web based anatomy curricula. He has been an AMI member since 1997, and a member of the Board of Certification of Medical Illustration.


Steven Harrison received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Medical Illustration from the Medical College of Georgia (MCG), and a Ph.D. in Art from the University of Georgia. After graduation from MCG he held positions as a medical animator at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and as a medical art director at the Arizona Heart Institute and at Barrow Neurological Institute, both in Phoenix. For the past twenty years, he taught anatomical and surgical illustration in the Medical Illustration Graduate Program at Georgia Health Sciences University, and was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medical Illustration. His illustrations and animations have won numerous awards, including several CINE Golden Eagles and an EMMY award. Harrison is a fellow of both the Association of Medical Illustrators and the Bio Communications Association and served as Chairman of the Board of the AMI. Since his retirement from GHSU in October, 2011, Harrison has been teaching beginning and advanced drawing at Augusta State University.


Dr. Anne Agur is currently the President of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and Professor in the Division of Anatomy, Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto. She is the coauthor of Grant's Atlas of Anatomy, Essential Clinical Anatomy, and Clinically Oriented Anatomy.




ePMV: Molecular Graphics
Instructors: Graham Johnson, PhD, CMI and Fabian Kok-Mercado, MA, CMI
Location: University of Toronto Mississauga, HSC 317
8:30am - 5:30pm (includes one hour break for lunch from 12:30pm-1:30pm)
Cost: Member $150 / Non-Member $295
0.4 CEUs art, 0.4 CEUs biomedical
Maximum size 8 -
Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list

Description: The embedded Python Molecular Viewer (ePMV) runs molecular-modeling software directly in the GUIs of Blender, Cinema4D, and Maya. This workshop will introduce Structural Biology via ePMV basics that include loading, modeling, and chemically coloring dozens of molecular file types and building accurate DNA strands from ATCG sequences. The workshop will then transition smoothly to cover highly advanced ePMV techniques, for example, running molecular dynamics simulations. Software is available free with more information at http://epmv.scripps.edu.
Graham Johnson is a Certified Medical Illustrator with 15 years of professional experience. He has specialized in molecular and cellular biology since graduating from The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1997. He illustrated both editions of the textbook Cell Biology by Pollard and Earnshaw as a coauthor, and has created thousands of scientific visuals ranging from journal covers to pedagogic animations and game designs. Graham currently lives in San Francisco, CA and works at UCSF as a qb3@UCSF Faculty Fellow. His PhD work in the Molecular Graphics Lab at Scripps focused primarily on developing algorithms to enable scientists and illustrators to generate, simulate, and visualize molecular models of cells. He continues to work with programmers to develop software that can interoperate the computational tools of science and art. Graham gives lectures on both molecular graphics and protein docking to structural biology and biophysics graduate students, medical illustrators, and high school students. More information and a CV can be found on his website at www.grahamj.com.


Fabian de Kok-Mercado is a Certified Medical Illustrator who received his master's degree in medical and biological illustration from the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is currently employed by the Battelle Memorial Institute as the Medical Illustrator for the NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Integrated Research Facility in Frederick, MD. He also operates ProAtlantal Studio, a biomedical illustration and animation business, with his wife and colleague, Lydia Gregg.

Creative Portraiture and Caricature: Getting in Touch With Your Inner Animal
Instructors: Anita Kunz
Location: University of Toronto Mississauga, CCT2134
8:30am - 5:30pm (includes one hour break for lunch from 12:30pm-1:30pm)
Cost: Member $150 / Non-Member $295
0.8 CEUs Art
Maximum size 20

Description: Much of Anita's work involves evolution as a subject matter. The fact that we share so much DNA with other species explains a lot about our behaviour! As an artist for more than 30 years Anita is always looking for ways to remain fresh, and to remember the joy of creating art. She asks that participants throw away their preconceived ideas, their constantly critical minds, and get back to the pure joy and fun of drawing. She's found that by making anthropomorphic images we can open our minds to new possibilities with our art and remember why we became artists in the first place.


Canadian by birth, Anita Kunz has lived in London, New York, and Toronto, contributing to magazines and working for design firms, book publishers, and advertising agencies internationally. She has produced cover art for many magazines including Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, Sports Illustrated, Time, Newsweek, The Atlantic Monthly, and The New York Times Magazine. She has also illustrated more than fifty book jacket covers. In the fall of 2003, she was the first woman and the first Canadian to have a solo show at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. In 2007, Anita gave a short presentation about her New Yorker covers at the prestigious TED conference in Monterey, California. Anita has been named one of the fifty most influential women in Canada by the National Post newspaper. She has been made an Officer of the Order of Canada (Canada's highest civilian honor) and she recently received an honorary doctorate from the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto.




Information Visualization using Processing
Instructors: Ryo Sakai and Bang Wong
Location: University of Toronto, Mississauga, HSC315
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Cost: Member $115 / Non-Member $225
0.4 CEUs art
Maximum size 16 -
Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list

Description: Processing is a programming language that simplifies and extends the Java language. It is an ideal environment for "sketching" with code. This workshop will cover the basics of programming. We will start by making abstract generative art and apply the same principles to visualize a sample dataset. By working through examples, participants will learn how to load a data file, create graphical representations of those data and export the results as vector images that can be further edited in Adobe Illustrator. The workshop is intended for those new to programming and want to have fun with code.


Ryo Sakai is a PhD candidate studying data visualization in a bioinformatics group at KU Leuven in Belgium. His work focuses on developing interactive visualization systems to support exploration and analysis of the unprecedented scale and variety of data, by close collaboration with domain experts. Ryo received a master's degree in biomedical communications from the University of Toronto (Canada), a master's degree in computing and information systems from Queen Mary (UK) University of London, and a Professional Doctorate in engineering from the User System Interaction Program at Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands).


Bang Wong is the Creative Director of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. His work focuses on the visual representation of scientific information. He leads a research group that explores how informative visual encodings of data coupled with the researchers' knowledge of the subject under investigation is a potent combination for discovery. Bang received a master's degree in immunology and a master's degree in medical illustration both from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Delta Chelsea Hotel

AMI First-Timers Luncheon
Instructors: Megan E. B. Foldenauer, MA, CMI and Emily Shaw, MA, CMI, EMT-B
Keynote Speaker: Jennifer E. Fairman, MA, CMI, FAMI
Guests: Jane Hurd, John A. Nyquist, MS, CMI, Amanda Yarberry Behr, MA, CMI
Location: Delta Chelsea Hotel, Carlyle Room
1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Cost: FREE
NO CEUs
Limit 60

Description: This workshop is intended for students, new AMI members, and all other individuals who are attending the AMI meeting for their first time. The session will introduce newcomers to each other, the AMI, the Annual Meeting, AMI Headquarters, the AMI Board of Governors, and much more. Attendees of this workshop can expect to gain a sense of appreciation for the AMI and how it can facilitate advancement in a medical illustrator's career. Several AMI member guest speakers will visit and discuss some of their reasons for becoming involved in the AMI. Featured keynote speaker Jennifer E. Fairman, CMI, FAMI will give a presentation on her career as a medical illustrator, showing pieces from her student and professional portfolios, while giving insight into her development as a professional artist.
Megan E. B. Foldenauer, MA, CMI is a 2002 graduate of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, a 1998 graduate from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (with a focus on scientific illustration/drawing), and has run her own scientific illustration studio, Megalo-Media Illustration, for nine years. She is also a fine artist with over eleven years exhibiting experience and is a recipient of several teaching awards including the Outstanding Supplemental Instruction Leader of the Year (in Anatomy) at Eastern Michigan University. She remains an anatomy nut, audiophile, genealogist, roller derby girl, and a die-hard Cubs fan as she makes her way through her PhD in Anatomy and Cell Biology at Wayne State University, School of Medicine in Detroit, MI.


Emily Shaw, MA, CMI, EMT-B, is fine artist with a BFA from MICA and medical illustrator with an MA from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Department of Art as Applied to Medicine where she was awarded a Vesalius Trust Alan W. Cole scholarship for her thesis project on trypanosome KDNA replication. Emily has been sole proprietor of Illustrating Medicine for eight years with clients such as National Institutes of Health, Johnson & Johnson, and Lippincott Williams, & Wilkins. She has six years experience in the field of clinical simulation, developing virtual reality "serious games", serving as a simulation specialist for Laerdal Medical, proctoring the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery exam for SAGES, and is currently the lead simulation technologist for three SiTEL Clinical Simulation Centers, which provide simulation-based clinical continuing education for nine MedStar Health hospitals. In her spare time she loves motherhood, playing roller derby, gardening, teaching CPR for AHA, and pursuing EMT-Paramedic certification.


Jennifer E. Fairman, CMI, FAMI is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine where she previously received her MA in Medical and Biological Illustration from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Jennifer is also the Founder and Principal of Fairman Studios, LLC, a board certified biomedical communications studio specializing in medical, scientific and biological illustration, medical animation, interactive design, web and graphic design for biomedical clients. She previously served as a Scientific Illustrator, Research Associate and James Smithson Fellow for the Smithsonian Institution (USDA Systematic Entomology Laboratory) located within the National Museum of Natural History. Her work at the Smithsonian also brought her to Costa Rica on a Smithsonian Women's Committee Grant, where at INBio she assisted in systematic entomological research and taught scientific illustration. After receiving her Masters degree from Johns Hopkins, Jennifer relocated to Boston to work as a staff medical illustrator for the Lahey Clinic, a suburban hospital and community group practice. Shortly thereafter, she founded Fairman Studios. She is the 1999 Inez Demonet Scholar, an AMI Fellow and the recipient of the AMI's Outstanding Achievement Award. She currently resides in Baltimore with her husband and son.

Drawing with Water-Soluble Colored Pencils
Instructors: James Gurney
Location: Delta Chelsea Hotel, Scott Room
1:30pm to 5:30pm
Cost: Member $150 / Non-Member $295
0.4 CEUs art
Maximum size 24 -
Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list

Description: Most illustrators are familiar with colored pencils and with watercolor, but the idea for combining the two with water-soluble colored pencils, water brushes, and watercolors opens up many opportunities both for careful rendering and quick sketching. Mr. Gurney will give a digital presentation showing a range of techniques, and will give a demo to show the materials in action. Then workshop attendees can try the materials on a still life object of their choice with Mr. Gurney's input and feedback.


Note: Participants will need to bring the following art supplies or equivalent: A Niji (Kuretake) water brush (medium or large), a set of 12 or more Caran d'Ache Supracolor II pencils (or Derwent InkTense as a substitute), and a Moleskine watercolor journal, 5 x 8 inch or larger. Suitable specimens to draw such as bones, shells, dinosaur models, and other still life objects will be provided on-site, as well as a small lamp for lighting each specimen.


James Gurney was born June 14, 1958 in Glendale, California. Raised in Palo Alto (the youngest of five children), James earned a B.A. in anthropology in 1979 with honors at the University of California at Berkeley and studied painting at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, where he met his wife-to-be Jeanette, also an artist. In 1984 they moved to the Hudson Valley of New York State, where they raised two sons, Daniel and Franklin. James Gurney is the author and illustrator of numerous books and articles, including the Dinotopia series, Imaginative Realism: How to Paint What Doesn't Exist and Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter.

University of Toronto St. George Campus

Clinical Anatomy of the Hand: Serial Dissection and Illustration
Instructors: Dr. Anne Agur and Valerie Oxorn
Location: University of Toronto St. George Campus, Medical Sciences Building Anatomy Department
1:30pm - 5:30pm
Cost: Member $100 / Non-Member $195
0.4 Biomedical CEUs
Maximum size 10 -
Sold Out! Contact hq@ami.org for wait list

Description: Participants will be able to observe a serial dissection of a fresh cadaveric hand and sketch each level of dissection. The objective of this workship is to review the 3D anatomy of the hand in an unembalmed specimen and to produce a series of sketches of the serial dissections for future reference.
Note: Participants should bring sketch pads and drawing tools of their choice; photography will not be allowed.


Dr. Anne Agur is currently the President of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and Professor in the Division of Anatomy, Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto. She is the coauthor of Grant's Atlas of Anatomy, Essential Clinical Anatomy, and Clinically Oriented Anatomy.


Valerie Oxorn, MA, MSc BMC graduated from the University of Toronto Biomedical Communications program in 1997. She has since worked as a medical illustrator for print publications including anatomy textbooks, professional medical journals and instructional materials for allied sciences and alternative health. Working closely with anatomists Anne Agur and Art Dalley, she has made numerous contributions to such books as Grant's Atlas of Anatomy and Essential Clinical Anatomy. She has recently embarked on a study of the traditional practice of oil painting, combining her interests in anatomy and psychology to explore the beauty of light, shadow and the subtleties of the human form through portraits and figure studies.

Grant's Museum and the Artists of Grant's Atlas
Instructors: Margot Mackay
Location: University of Toronto St. George Campus, Grant's Museum, Medical Sciences Building
1:30pm to 5:30pm
Cost: Member $100 / Non-Member $195
0.2 CEUs art, 0.2 CEUs biomedical
Maximum size 16

Description: J.C.B. Grant's Atlas of Anatomy marked a paradigm shift in the preparation and presentation of anatomical dissection for medical students. One unique aspect of this landmark work, created at the University of Toronto, was the museum designed to display the actual specimens used for the illustrations. This allowed medical students to compare the illustrations in the atlas with the anatomical material to better understand the relationship between the reality of dissection and the role of the illustration in conveying information about key anatomical points. Participants will learn about the role of the principal artists and their participation in creating the atlas, and have an opportunity to sketch directly from these historically significant dissections.


Note: Participants should bring sketch pads & drawing tools of their choice; photography will not be allowed (cameras are not allowed in Grant's Museum).


Margot Mackay is Professor Emerita in the Biomedical Communications program at the University of Toronto, where she taught surgical illustration. Her illustrations have been widely published in surgical textbooks and peer-reviewed medical journals, and many of the images have been used extensively in projection media. Her research interests lie in development of educational visual material pertaining to surgery for surgeons, residents, allied health professionals and lay audiences. She received training from, worked with, or was personally acquainted with all of Dr. Grant's artists.

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